14 January 2016, 17:08 PM
  • The Soil Association has launched the BOOM Awards, a celebration of quality, innovation, creativity and great taste in organic products, retailers and places to eat
Soil Association Launches Organic Awards

Judged by an independent panel of recognised experts in the food industry, the awards include categories for restaurants, street food and caterers as well as products. A consumer choice award will be open to nominations from the public.

Other categories include cheese; dairy; fresh produce; bakery; confectionery; pantry; meat, fish and poultry and independent retailers.

Any company which has organic as part of their business is encouraged to enter, and there is a discount for Soil Association Certification licensees.

Clare McDermott, business development director at The Soil Association said, “The BOOMs are a chance to shout about the very best in organic. Independent retailers saw sales of organic grow 5.7% in 2015 and we want the BOOMs to showcase the inspirational entrepreneurs behind this growth. With over 1,000 new products licensed with Soil Association Certification in 2015 we know that there is fantastic innovation going on in the organic sector.

“The BOOMs will be a great opportunity to showcase products and places to buy and eat organic to the influencers and customers of today. As well as the great awards ceremony at Borough Market with Anna Jones, we’ll be holding blogger events to showcase finalists products and providing marketing toolkits to the winners.

“We’ve had a great response so far and it’s time to make some (even more) noise about Organic to buyers, customers and media.”

For more information and to enter the awards, visit soilassociation.org/boomawards

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